No more Texas governors for president

“Next time I tell you someone from Texas should not be president of the United States, please pay attention.” - Molly Ivins
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Posts tagged "equality"

Obama made one direct and one indirect reference to gay and lesbian people in his State of the Union address.

“It is our unfinished task to restore the basic bargain that built this country – the idea that if you work hard and meet your responsibilities, you can get ahead, no matter where you come from, what you look like, or who you love,” he said near the start of the speech.

Later on, while discussing his role as commander-in-chief, he said, “We will ensure equal treatment for all service members, and equal benefits for their families – gay and straight.”

Fred Sainz, a spokesperson for the Human Rights Campaign, praised the president’s words.

“These inclusions in the speech are meaningful,” Sainz wrote in an email. “Both reaffirm his commitment to equality in ways that are substantively important. This President has done a lot for LGBT people but one of his greatest legacies will be the unapologetic way in which he has included LGBT people when speaking about our country and the way it should afford opportunity to all.”

Lila Shapiro

asiansnotstudying:

Silent No More:

I try to imagine the government coming to my house one morning and taking my five year old daughter and eight year old son away to a boarding school hundreds of kilometres away. I try to imagine that at this school, my children’s hair will be cut, their dastars and kakkars will be removed and they will be forcibly baptized as Christians. I try to imagine that they will be beaten for speaking Panjabi, reading Bani or trying to maintain their religious and cultural traditions. I try to imagine that even their basic health needs will not be looked after and they may well die from treatable infections and diseases. And then, I must admit, I am not able to imagine the rest; I can not bear to imagine them being abused, assaulted, beaten and raped.

That is what occurred in this country for one hundred years as the Canadian government, along with government sanctioned church groups, kidnapped First Nations children from their homes and took them to residential schools where unspeakable horrors were committed on them. Of course the history of colonization in the Americas does not begin with the Residential School system but is in fact a legacy going back centuries. It is estimated that 90 to 95% of all indigenous people living in the Americas were killed by smallpox within the first century after European first contact in the late 1400’s. It is difficult to fathom death at that scale. Those that remained had their land stolen and were forced onto reservations to live as non-citizens in their own lands.

As a nation, Sikhs are extremely proud of our own anti-colonial struggle against the British. Yet we have completely failed to acknowledge that in Canada we have succeeded due to the colonial oppression of other nations. This land where we build our homes and businesses was the land of nations that lived here for tens of thousands of years. Yes, one hundred and seventy years ago the British annexed Panjab and ended Khalsa Raj. But the British did not exile us from our own villages and towns. The British did not take our land and build new cities. The British did not migrate to Panjab and force us to live on inadequate reserves.

We face discrimination in Canada and suffer from chronic underfunding in order to address challenging issues like domestic violence, sexual abuse and drug use. However, we are not without means. We have Sikh representatives at every level of government across the country and have been financially successful as a community. We owe a debt to this country and to its true heritage; not the Canada evolved from French and British colonies but to a land that was the sovereign territory of nations that sustainably farmed, fished and hunted here since before the dawn of history.

It has become an integral part of how we define ourselves, this message that “Sikhs believe in equality” but speaking those words is easy; living this in truth is much more difficult. We need to demonstrate our commitment to the revolutionary message of Guru Nanak Sahib, that every human being contains equally an aspect of the divine and that we are all truly worthy of having our basic human needs and rights protected and defended. In fact, this impulse to speak against the oppressor in defense of the rights of the other stems from the Gurus themselves. It was Guru Nanak Sahib himself who faced down the first Mughal Emperor Babur after his invading forces had committed horrendous massacres. Though Guru Nanak Sahib stood alone, he did not hesitate to speak against those who had perpetrated the crimes he witnessed.

One of the most treasured episodes in Sikh history is the Shaheedi of Guru Tegh Bahadur Sahib. In November of 1675, Guru jee gave his life in the streets of Delhi. He did not die for Sikh rights but instead he gave his head as an act of political disobedience against the Mughal Empire’s forced conversion of Hindus. That a leader of a religion would die to to defend the rights of another religion is almost unbelievable and Guru Tegh Bahadur’s example still stands uniquely in all of human history. It is our Ninth Guru’s example that Sikhs strive to emulate when we defend the rights of those who are different from us.

But it is more than just defending the rights of the other. The Guru asks us to stand with those who are been marginalized, those who society considers low and unworthy. As Guru Nanak Sahib reveals in Asa ki Vaar, he himself identifies as one of those who others call low:

ਹਉ ਢਾਢੀ ਕਾ ਨੀਚ ਜਾਤਿ ਹੋਰਿ ਉਤਮ ਜਾਤਿ ਸਦਾਇਦੇ ॥

Ha▫o dẖādẖī kā nīcẖ jāṯ hor uṯam jāṯ saḏā▫iḏe. (SGGS 468).

That is the challenge put forth to us by the Guru, that we must place ourselves in the position of those who have no power in our societies, those who have been cast off and dehumanized.

Idle No More is a response not only to the legacy of colonialism but the continuing colonialism that First Nations people are being subjected to. First Nations simply want the their rights as a sovereign people respected. They want justice for the crimes of the past and the basic human dignity that all people are entitled to. They want control of their resources and the right to educate and govern themselves as they see fit. Does this sound familiar? It’s exactly what Sikhs have been struggling for in India for the last several decades. From the Anandpur Sahib Resolution to the demand for justice for victims of massacres, human rights abuses and pogroms to Panjab’s ongoing struggle with government enabled substance and alcohol abuse, the parallels between Idle No More and contemporary Sikh struggles is striking.

But these protesters are not just fighting for themselves, they are fighting for all of our rights. They are fighting against the government’s omnibus bill and its erosion of environmental protection. They are fighting for all of our futures.

Today we face many problems as a community. We face internal divisions and external threats. But that has always been the case throughout Sikh history. Things have never been easy for our people. But we are capable of greatness when we are united. And when do we unite? When we struggle for justice, freedom and equality. Idle No More is a growing movement. It is the voice of a people demanding their rights. We need not care about political expediency.

Sikh history is clear: the Sikh response to marginalized people fighting for rights has always been simple.We stand with you. Against all odds, we stand for you.

Outgoing U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar plans to be in Seattle on Sunday to designate the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience an “affiliated area” of the National Park Service.

I was just there last week! Congratulations, Wing Luke!! :)

About the museum’s namesake:

The Wing’s namesake, Wing Luke, was the oldest child and first English-speaking member of a Chinese immigrant family that ran a University District laundry.

Luke became student body president at Roosevelt High, received a Bronze Star in the Army, earned a law degree and worked as an assistant state attorney general before being elected to the Seattle City Council in 1962.

Known for his commitment to civil rights, Luke was instrumental in the passage of a Seattle ordinance banning racial discrimination in housing.

But before the end of his first term, Luke, then 40, died along with two companions in a light-plane crash in the Cascades in 1965 while returning from a fishing trip to Okanogan County.

Our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers, and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law—for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. Our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. Our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as a land of opportunity; until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. Our journey is not complete until all our children, from the streets of Detroit to the hills of Appalachia to the quiet lanes of Newtown, know that they are cared for, and cherished, and always safe from harm.
President Obama, second inaugural address (via barackobama)

apiasfrepresent:

By Anne Kim, APIASF/GMS Scholar

Dec 3/ re/present
Lt. Dan Choi re/presents his beliefs of equality in voice, representation, and rights. His defiance of military and cultural norms for the sake of values those very institutions taught him as being right inspires us to be true to our values.

fuckyeahrachelmaddow:

Regardless, Marriage Equality is on the ballot tomorrow in 4 states. Make your vote count!

via thefour

(via malindalo)

"Binders full of women."

That’s what Mitt Romney offered up as his solution to leveling the playing field for women in the workplace.

A binder didn’t help me get equal pay for equal work at Goodyear, and it’s not helping the women across the country who are making 77 cents for every dollar a man gets. That’s no plan for equality — and American women deserve better.

The “binders” comment is new, but leveling the playing field has never been part of Romney’s agenda. He was opposed to the Fair Pay Act that bears my name. He refuses to take a stand on the Paycheck Fairness Act. Romney wants to defund Planned Parenthood and put a politician between a woman and her health decisions — he’ll drag our rights back in time.

President Obama gets it. He has worked tirelessly to make sure women have a fair shot. His comment Tuesday night shows the stark contrast between him and Romney: “These are not just women’s issues. These are family issues. These are economic issues. And one of the things that makes us grow as an economy is when everybody participates and women are getting the same fair deal as men are.”

We’ve got 19 days left to make sure every single woman understands the clear choice in this election.

Use the campaign’s call tool right now to reach out to other women. Get them to vote and fight alongside you for the candidate who’s got our back:

http://my.barackobama.com/Call-Women-Today

Thanks,

Lilly


——-
Election Day is only 19 days away. Donate today before it’s too late.

ofa-co:

The Head and the Heart are supporting and voting for a President who’s #ForAll. 

(via obamaforamerica-illinois)

lbjlibrary:

June 4, 1965. LBJ speaks at Howard University. 

“You do not take a person who, for years, has been hobbled by chains and liberate him, bring him up to the starting line of a race and then say, ‘you are free to compete with all the others,’ and still justly believe that you have been completely fair.

Thus it is not enough just to open the gates of opportunity. All our citizens must have the ability to walk through those gates.

This is the next and the more profound stage of the battle for civil rights. We seek not just freedom but opportunity. We seek not just legal equity but human ability, not just equality as a right and a theory but equality as a fact and equality as a result.”

Full text here

The religion was founded in the 1600s and today has a following of over 20 million people worldwide.

Sikhism preaches a message of devotion and remembrance of God at all times, truthful living, equality of mankind, social justice and denounces superstitions and blind rituals. Sikhism is open to all.

The work ‘Sikh’ comes from the Punjabi language meaning ‘disciple.’  Sikhs are the disciples of God who follow the writings and teachings of the Ten Sikh Gurus. The Sikhs say their teachings are practical and universal in their appeal to all mankind.

Each one of the ten Gurus represents a divine attribute:

Guru Nanak - Humility
Guru Angad - Obedience
Guru Amar Das — Equality
Guru Ram Das - Service
Guru Arjan - Self-Sacrifice
Guru Hargobind - Justice
Guru Har Rai - Mercy
Guru Harkrishan - Purity
Guru Tegh Bahadur - Tranquility
Guru Gobind Singh - Royal Courage

In addition to the Oak Creek temple, the Sikh community has a southeastern Wisconsin temple in Brookfield.



invisiblelad:

racialicious:

nprhuddle:

This is the woman behind “Feminist (Hey Girl) Ryan Gosling,” the meme that refuses to die. She’s Black, and has faced questions about sharing her perspectives on feminism in this way. From the article:

You’re a black woman, spreading the message of feminism through the face of a white male. Is that weird?
Doing it from this point of view was intentional. I mean, if I was just picking actors I was attracted to, it would have been Feminist Idris Elba. But part of the fun for me was replicating this trope from a younger white guy who’s not identified as a feminist, coming from the voice of a black feminist. In the beginning, a lot of people didn’t get that that was part of the joke. I got a lot of emails saying, “You’re talking about feminism and women of color through the lens of this white guy — and that’s really fucked up.” Nobody knew where I was coming from.

Hey Girl, Equality is Sexy: The Badass Woman Behind ‘Feminist Ryan Gosling’ on Her New Book —Jessica Bennett

File under “Shit That Rocks Hard.”

I think I might like everything about this. Especially her glasses.

invisiblelad:

racialicious:

nprhuddle:

This is the woman behind “Feminist (Hey Girl) Ryan Gosling,” the meme that refuses to die. She’s Black, and has faced questions about sharing her perspectives on feminism in this way. From the article:

You’re a black woman, spreading the message of feminism through the face of a white male. Is that weird?

Doing it from this point of view was intentional. I mean, if I was just picking actors I was attracted to, it would have been Feminist Idris Elba. But part of the fun for me was replicating this trope from a younger white guy who’s not identified as a feminist, coming from the voice of a black feminist. In the beginning, a lot of people didn’t get that that was part of the joke. I got a lot of emails saying, “You’re talking about feminism and women of color through the lens of this white guy — and that’s really fucked up.” Nobody knew where I was coming from.

Hey Girl, Equality is Sexy: The Badass Woman Behind ‘Feminist Ryan Gosling’ on Her New Book —Jessica Bennett

File under “Shit That Rocks Hard.”

I think I might like everything about this. Especially her glasses.

(via womanistgamergirl)

Genius. Bravo, Kermit!

funnyordie:

Kermit Breaks Up with Chick-fil-A

Every frog has its breaking point.