No more Texas governors for president

“Next time I tell you someone from Texas should not be president of the United States, please pay attention.” - Molly Ivins
Recent Tweets @ebeh

theatlantic:

The Day Yahoo Decided I Liked Reading About Child Murder

On February 8, 2012, I was on Yahoo’s homepage when a headline caught my eye: “Mo. teen gets life with possible parole in killing.” Curious, I clicked to see what atrocity had transpired in the state where I live. Alyssa Bustamante, a teenager from Jefferson City, had strangled and stabbed her nine-year-old neighbor for the sheer thrill of it, later describing the event in her diary as an “ahmazing” experience. Horrified, I closed the page. Like many whose homepage defaults to Yahoo, this quick scan of a story was a rote action, information via procrastination, almost subconsciously performed every morning before I move on to other things. In this case, the story was so awful that I wanted to get away. Except, it turned out, I couldn’t.

For the next month, I woke up to a barrage of horrifying stories that seemed to signal an epidemic of child torture in America. “3-year-old recovering after swallowing 37 powerful magnets,” Yahoo solemnly informed me on March 5; “Police: Alaska girl locked in frigid bedroom dies” on March 6. Occasionally the child in question survived their ordeal (“7-year-old boy survives brush with tornado in North Carolina”, March 4) but more often than not they were the adversary (“Boy, 9, charged in shooting of third-grade classmate”, February 23; “11-year-old California girl dies after fight with classmate”, February 26; “Texas boy, 12, accused of brandishing loaded gun”, February 27; “10-year-old girl’s death in fight with student ruled homicide”, February 27).  

I rarely clicked on any of these headlines, and at first, I didn’t notice the way they had crept into my Yahoo homepage — and into my mind — until their pervasiveness became impossible to ignore.

That’s when I realized: Yahoo had decided I liked child murder.

Read more.

  1. ladywiththehair reblogged this from theatlantic
  2. quickiekissit reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Weird, weird, weird.
  3. kv96ic28 reblogged this from pegobry
  4. pegobry reblogged this from theatlantic
  5. john-37058 reblogged this from theatlantic
  6. hungry-skin-vacant-meat reblogged this from theatlantic
  7. anteco reblogged this from theatlantic
  8. 2infiniteloop reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Ahahaa
  9. idosoloveyoursilence reblogged this from theatlantic
  10. wizardblue reblogged this from theatlantic
  11. sharingpurellwithhowardhughes reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    This reminds me of the SuperNews! bit about the GoogleToilet. Dammit…Now I miss SuperNews!
  12. nomoretexasgovernorsforpresident reblogged this from theatlantic
  13. sosanguine reblogged this from theatlantic
  14. booksnbytes reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    What we read and how we are tracked can create false portraits of ourselves.
  15. bobeda reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Be careful what you search for.
  16. elizs reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    The Filter Bubble at work, folks.
  17. gugugutwrench reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    This is slightly mortifying.
  18. bootsandvodka reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    But really, who doesn’t like child murder?
  19. theatlantic posted this